the old culture from balinese and all i know will show in this blog

Monday, 30 June 2008

Bali Island of the Culture

About the Bali Arts Festival

The Bali Arts Festival is a full month of daily performances, handicraft exhibitions and other related cultural and commercial activities during which literally the whole of Bali comes to the city to present its offerings of dance, music and beauty. On display are trances from remote mountain slopes, forgotten or recently revived village dances, food and offering contests, classical palace dances, stars of Balinese stage, odd musical performances, “kreasi baru” (new creations) from the dance schools of Denpasar, as well as contemporary choreography and dance companies from other islands and from abroad.

It is a month long revelry that perhaps no other place in the world can put up on such a low budget as the Balinese. Not only is their traditional culture alive and well, but they have a tremendous pride in it.

It begins in the villages, where the seka or cultural groups are selected and organized at the regency level, vie with each other to perform the Arts Festival and thus display in front of a large audience the uniqueness of their village of birth and resting place of their ancestors.

The Bali Arts Festival is the Denpasar cultural event of the year, perhaps it would no be too far fetched to suggest that it is the cultural event of Indonesia. The festival is thus a unique opportunity to see local village culture both “live” and at first hand. Tourists are warmly welcomed.

The History of the Bali Arts Festival

When tourism took off after 1965, the Balinese insisted that it followed cultural guidelines: if tourism was to be accepted, it was to be a cultural tourism, or “pariwisata budaya”.

As the Balinese put it: “Tourism should be for Bali instead of Bali for tourism.” In time, this idea become national policy, as part of a larger revping of regional cultures for national purposes. The policy owes much to the former Director General of Culture (1968-1978) and Governor of Bali (1978-1988), Ida Bagus Mantra, an Indian-educed Balinese. It led, on the one side, to the creation of enclave resorts such as Nusa Dua to limit the direct impact of tourism, and on the other, to a long haul cultural policy aimed at nurturing and preserving the traditional agrarian culture while adapting it to the demands of modernity, and in particular of “cultural tourism”.

At the village level, local music groups, dances and other cultural events were inventoried, then supported by a series of contests at the district and regency level. The ensuing competition energized the cultural life of villages, whose “young blood” was already being drained to the city by the process of economic change and urbanization.

Schools of dance and art were created, in particular the Kokar conservatory and the STSI School of Dance and Music. Beside research, these schools replaced the traditional master/disciple relationship by modern methods of teaching; standardized the dance movements, produced new types of Balinese dances for tourism and modern village entertainment. Most important, it enabled former students to return to the villages as teachers, where they diffused, beside the creed of cultural resilience and renewal, new dances and standardized versions of old ones.

Many of the performances are held at the amphitheater which can hold up to 6,000 spectators, in a temple-like stage

Bali Culture Festival 2008








30 years of developing and preserving Bali's arts and culture

For the people of Bali, June and July are identical with the Bali Culture Festival (Pesta Kesenian Bali, PKB). In 2008, the festival will celebrate its 30th anniversary. No discussion of the PKB can fail to mention the late Prof. Dr. Ida Bagus Mantra, who initiated it in 1979 while serving as Bali's Governor. The idea arose from the fact that as life becomes more globalized, cultural contact becomes inevitable. His vision was that this cultural contact should not be allowed to destroy the nation's cultural identity; he felt that Bali's culture, with its emphasis on traditional arts and culture in daily life, could and should be maintained and developed.

The Bali Arts Festival is, therefore, not just a means for preserving the arts and culture of the past, but also for delving into their heritage and creating new manifestations.

In Bali, artistic activity is found in all aspects of daily life, as part of the local people's devotional offerings to God, known as Yadnya. They strive to constantly offer their best, based on their sincere devotion born from their culture as the wellspring of the community's mutual love and spiritual civilization. The Bali Arts Festival has survived for 30 years thanks to this spirit, known in Bali as ngayah.

This popular festival is both intracultural celebration for the Balinese themselves and a national and international intercultural event. As it has developed, the festival is no longer just a medium for preserving and developing the arts of Bali; arts from outside Bali and even from abroad are also displayed. The purpose of this is to foster the community's appreciation and achieve a level of artistic maturity and appreciation that accommodates positive aspects from outside to enrich and expand the vocabulary of Bali's arts.

This year's Bali Arts Festival runs from 14 June through 12 July 2008 and takes the theme Citta Wretti Nirodha, meaning "self control leading to balance and harmony". The major events of the festival include a cultural parade, performances, contests and parades, exhibitions, and symposiums. It will also coincide with several other national and international events.

International events include the World Wayang Festival, the All-ASEAN Ethnic Music Festival, and the Bali Cultural Congress, while national-scale events include the Java-Bali Student Arts Festival and the Festival of Traditional Regional Artworks by members of Mitra Praja Utama.

The Bali Provincial Culture Office has announced that to date, 12 foreign arts groups and 20 provinces from Indonesia are scheduled to take part. Even so, the arts of Bali will still dominate a majority of the performances, with local artists from all eight regencies and one city in Bali – an estimated 12,000 artists during the five weeks.

The Culture Parade kicks off the PKB each year, at Puputan Margarana Square, Renon, Denpasar, right in front of the Monument of the Balinese People's Struggle. Most of the other main events will take place at Taman Budaya Bali (Werdhi Budaya), better known locally by the English name Bali Arts Center. The cultural parade that opens the PKB tends to be far better known to tourists than the five weeks of performances that follow at Taman Budaya. Tourists tend to neglect these performances; the audience is mostly Balinese. Although it is not meant purely as a tourist attraction, if you are alert, you can see a great variety of arts during these five weeks – art forms reconstructed from the past, innovative new creations, cultural attractions, and appreciation of local communities' arts and culture. Aside from performing arts, there will also be exhibitions of products of small-scale industries and household handicrafts.

It's no coincidence that the festival is held in June and July, during the long school holidays in Indonesia. As well as attracting tourists and other adult visitors, with this timing the festival hopes to draw the nation's youth to witness the events, so that the PKB will truly be a means for preserving and developing Bali's culture and transmitting it to future generations.

Thursday, 26 June 2008

Welcome To Bali Arts Painting – UbudPainting.com

Bali Painting Collection, an online Bali Paintings Gallery, corporfeatures many original artworks of ingenious Balinese artists. We work very closely with the artists and aim at achieving high quality paintings for ate buyers, interior designers, and private collectors. Our main goal is to provide secure, easy, and confidence purchasing process.

Abstract Painting
This art does not depict objects in the natural world, but instead uses colour and form in a non-representational way. The more precise terms, "non-figurative art," "non-objective art," and "non-representational art" avoid any possible ambiguity. [ view this catalogue]

Flower Painting
Flowers will always be an endless inspirational to painter to explore this object. Bali flowers in an object of their paintings with traditional style and modern style. [ view this catalogue ]

Balinese Landscape Painting
Flowers will always be an endless inspirational to painter to explore this object. Bali flowers in an object of their paintings with traditional style and modern style. [ view this catalogue ]

Figurative Painting
Gateway page listing all artists that create figurative paintings using various painting techniques. Bali Figurative art paintings capturing the essence of human form. These paintings span the masters and the modernists.
[ view this catalogue ]

Buddha Art and Buddha Monk Painting
Buddha as an object for Balinese painter. The face, the body and their activity become trend for paintings object in Bali. [ view this catalogue ]

Bali Traditional Painting
The development of painting art in Bali has been recognized from the art of Balinese traditional paintings. Almost all the highly rich cultural depicted art paintings are anonymous artists since they did the work of art in a collaborative art and dedicated toward social and religious aspects.
[ view this catalogue ]

Animal and Wildlife Paintings
Birds, fish, floral and nature is painted on canvas with Ubud painting style. Lighting and colors effect makes the artwork soft and beautiful.
[ view this catalogue ]

Bali Realist Painting
Artists painting in a style started in 19th century France where the artist is realistic and paints every day events involving ordinary people and or nature as it truly appears. [ view this catalogue ]

Wednesday, 25 June 2008

Indonesia Bali

Bali is an Indonesian island that is rich in indigenous culture. A lot pf people say that Bali culture is unique and that the people of Bali have always been contented with the “now.” If you ask a Balinese person what heaven is like, the probable answer will be “just like Bali”. This only goes to show that most Balinese people are happy to be where they are and never worry.

One factor that contributes to this laidback lifestyle is the culture of close family ties in Bali. In the Balinese culture, support is always available. Balinese extended families are so tightly knit that all members usually reside in the same complex.

Hinduism is one of the main religions in Bali. The Bali culture is based on a form of this religion, which is called “Hindu Darma”. This religion reached the island during the eleventh century. Most of the family customs and traditions as well as community lifestyles of the Balinese people are influenced by this. The religious influence even expands widely into the arts, which makes Bali distinct from the rest of Indonesia.

In spite of the influx of tourists to the island, Balinese people have managed to preserve their culture. Almost every native of Bali is an artist in some form or another. Parents and villagers have passed on their skills to their children, who all seem to have inclinations either to music, dance, painting, and decor.

Another remarkable mark of the Bali culture is the series of ceremonies and rituals known as the Manusa Yadnya. This marks the different stages of Balinese life. Cremation is very popular on this island – and unlike in the West, death is a joyous and colorful event for the Balinese.

Monday, 23 June 2008

The People, the Village, and Orientation Of Bali

The People, the Village, and Orientation Of Bali

Bali is a densely populated island. Most of the population live in closely packed villages of 2.000 to 4.000 people on the fertile southern slopes of the island, along the ridges that carry the irrigation ditches. On these slopes it is usually only a fifteen minutes’ walk from one village to the next through the open rice-fields. On the northern coastal strip, the villages are spread along the Java sea. Traditionally the social organization of the island was based on the village, with each village being completed self-sufficient, providing all needs and functions from birth through cremation. Presently, as in all industrializing countries, the cities and tourist centers are absorbing, to some extent, the flow of goods and services. The social organization of the village is one of the most unique aspects of this enchanting island. The village is very much of communal unit, almost and extanded family. The layout of Balinese village and the life of is members is closely tied to religion and the religious life of the people. The center of village is usually an ancient and gnarled banyan tree, regarded as sacred and believed to be the first tree on earth. High in its creepered branches or in a special tower nearly is the village “kul kul,” a wooden gong that acts as a warning of danger, tells of a death in the village, of calls the men to gather for a meeting of the “banjar”. Its importance persists, even in the modern Indonesia stete. A village may have several banjars, with each banjar having some separate allegiances to certain temples, palaces, and holidays. Even the bustling metropolis of Denpasar is rigidly divided into its constituent banjars. All decisions concerning the walfare and future of its people are made by the 100 percent agreement of all married men in the banjar. The Balinese are aware that this means that new ideas take a long time to find their realization, but at least thing move along peacefully and in union. Each family has some communal duties to perform for the banjar. Almost every Balinese village has here major temples. The “pura desa,” (literally, the “temples of the village”) stands near the center of the village. Its functions are concerned with everyday village matters and ritually prescribed village gatherings. At the northern end of the village, towards the sacred mountain, Gunng Agung, is the “pura puseh.” This is a “origin” or “navel” temple, the temple dedicated to the spirits of the land and of ancient ancestors. In Bali towards the north, towards the mountain, is heavenly, good, “uranic,” towards the south, towards the sea, is earthly, evil, “chtonic.” As most villages are built on a slope, the southern end, or “kelod,” is the lowest part of the village as well. Here in the south are located the “pura dalem”, (the “temple of the dead”, and the burial ground with its mournful “ kepuh” tree. This temple is for the souls of the recently deceased and the major temples symbolize birth (pura puseh), and death (pura dalem). In the center of every banjar also the Bale Banjar, or banjar pavilion. Meeting are held here, village feast are prepared, and people gather here at night to play cards or just talk until the down. The communal work is administered from the Bale Banjar. This work consist of repairing roads, bridges, and irrigation canals, the upkeep of the temples and preparation for cockfights and celebrations. Many villagers spend more time in Banjar pavilion than they do at home. The Balinese do everything in pairs groups. The Bamboo platforms in the Bale Banjar become long best at night, where villagers often sleep, sardine-like, safe in the company of their fellow man. The banjar is the core of village life. It runs its own affairs as a communal organizations, such as the local dance group or rice-field association. In contrast to the egalitarian nature of the village political and economical organization , is the caste system, a mainly social convention based on the Indian ideal. Nearly every village has a “Geria” the recidence of a”brahmana,” and a”puri,” the residence or palace of a “ksatria.” Before the Banjar all are equal. Outside the banjar the “tri-wangsa” (the three higher castes) are held in great respect and are spoken to in a different, more refined language, than that used in every day speech on the roads or in the market. Over eighty per cent of the Balinese are “sudras” or casteless. The three higher castes are the descendants of the Javanese conquerors of Bali in the 14th century, or exile from the spread of Islam in Java in the 15th and 16th centuries. Traditionally the Brahmanas ( with the title Ida Bagus ) were the priestly and scholarly caste, the Ksatrias ( Anak Agung; Cokorda), the political and princely caste, the Waisya (Gusti), the administrative and warrior caste. Ideally the members of these caste should only marry within their own caste, but this conventions is no longer strictly adhered to. A Balinese, then, live under two bonds. The first is determined by his descend and caste. The second is determined democratically by his village and banjar organization. Before Indonesia gained independence there was a third bond owed to a liege lord or prince, similar to feudal Europe. Language is a complex matter in Bali, Basically there are two different Balinese languages. T common or low language of the sudras is of Austronesian (Polynesian) derivation. The high language of the tri-wangsa is a Javanese court language which owes much of its derivation to Sanskrit. A Sudra should use the high language when speaking to a member of a higher castes, and he should be replied to in low language. To cover the embarrassmem that sometime emerges, a polite, “middle” language is used. Now a fourth language, the state language Bahasa Indonesia is taught in the school as a unifier for the modern Indonesian Republic. Within the philosophy of Balinese religion are the consepts of “buwana alit” and “buwana agung,” the microcosm and the macrocosm. The individual is the microcosm of the society at large; the one can not exist without the other and they are, because of this, the same. Over the centuries, the Balinese have had and strong sense of culture and an orderly and human society. They had assimilated two period of influence from java. Now they face the influence of mass tourism and technology. Hopefully, the village structure.

Culture Balinese

Bali Culture
Bali, is famous for its scenic beauty, dynamic culture, and friendly people. Located just south of the equator, tropical Bali has a hot, wet season (November-March) and a cool, dry one (May-September). Towering volcanoes, some still active, contain large lakes which provide water for irrigating thousands of terraced rice fields, enabling up to three harvests per year.

Beliefs
The aim of Hindu Dharma is “ to reach peace of spirit and harmony in the material life”. In practicing their faith, H...

Galungan
Galungan is literally a celebration of the creation of the universe, in which the Supreme God. Creator of the univers...

Ngaben - The Cremation
Cremation of the dead (pengabenan, pelebon) is perhaps the most important, and often the most colorful, ritual of Bal...

Saraswati
A special day is devoted to Saraswati, the Goddess of learning science and literature, once a year according to the Wuku...

The Rites of Passage
The Balinese believe that the individual soul is reincarnated into many lifetimes, until through numerous struggles a...
Cycle of life
According to Hindu religious beliefs, after death, a soul passes into another body. During its tenure in the body, th...

Kuningan
Ten days after Galungan, this is the day on which the ancestors are bidden farewell with more offerings and freshly wove...

Nyepi
Balinese New Year’s day according to the Caka Calendar this is a day inactivity and silence throughout the island 24-...

The People, the Village, and Orientation
Bali is a densely populated island. Most of the population live in closely packed villages of 2.000 to 4.000 people o...

Way of life
Bali is a densely populated island. Most of the population live in closely packed villages of 2,000 to 4,000 people o...

Bali People And Culture

Bali People & Culture


In religion, the prehistoric influences, especially those of the megalithic periods were still quite strong. Beliefs at that time were focused on worship of the spirit of the ancestors which was symbolized in the form of temples which was called pyramid terraces or terraced buildings. Sometimes at the top of the building a menhir was placed, i.e. a monolith column as the symbol of their ancestor's spirit.

During the Hindu period, menhir could be seen in the construction of the temples which looked similar to the terraced pundan. Belief in the gods of the mountains, the sea etc, originated from the period before the arrival of Hinduism, was still reflected in the lives of people after the Hindu religion came in. At the beginning and during the period of King Sri Wijaya Mahadewi, the religion practiced is not mentioned. We know only the names of the priests who bore the name Siwa, such as Piwakangsita Siwa, biksu Siwanirmala and biksu Siwaprajna.

Based on that, the religion that developed at the time was the Siwa religion. Only during the period of King Udayana and his queen, there were two large religions practiced by the people, i.e. the Siwa religion and the Buddha religion. This information was obtained from the charters which mentioned mpungku Sewasogata (Siwa-Buddha) as the king's assistant.

Thursday, 19 June 2008

Bali Culture(The Bali Aga)

Bali culture is totally unique and permeates through every aspect of life. The influence of Hinduism the main religion is evident in the music, drama, art, costumes and festivals which take place daily.

You'll encounter a festival almost every day, celebrating the cycle of birth, death and rebirth. Anthropologists believe that the Balinese are descended from the ancient Chinese, the Indians and Arabs from the west, and others who came to the island directly or via Java.

The Bali Aga (The Original Balinese)

The original Balinese or Bali Aga, are a unique ethnic group that still live and practise a way of life that pre-dates modern civilisation. The Bali Aga are thought to be the original inhabitants of Bali who fled imperialistic invaders, eventually finding refuge in the solitude of Bali's remote mountains. Only two villages remain - which until recently, were firmly shut away from the rest of the world, hidden in the hills of East Bali.

Located just west of Candi Dasa lie the villages of Tenganan and Trunyan, isolated across the vast Lake Kintamani. The villages, home to the Bali Aga, are shut off by a solid wall surrounding the entire village. The wall is only broken by means of four gates, each facing north, south, east and west. Within these walls lies a massive Banyan tree surrounded by a low wall of uncut stones, making up a small enclosure for a very sacred temple. Tenganan has only recently opened up to outsiders although strict rules still apply, especially concerning marriage to outsiders. Tenganan has wonderful fabrics, including the renowned double weave ikat cloth.

The villagers of Tenganan are tall and slender with very pale complexions and refined manners. The men folk still wear their hair long and have a communistic system which does not recognize individual ownership of property. Every house in Tenganan looks exactly alike, with a flight of steps leading to a small gate opening into a courtyard with sleeping quarters, kitchen, and a long house for storage. A small empty shrine, signifies a place where spirits may rest when they visit their descendants.

Tenganan owns huge tracts of fertile and well cultivated lands capable of satisfying the needs of the village; and also making Tenganan one of the richest in Bali.

A people known for their filed and blackened teeth, the Bali Aga are said to bring the spirits of their ancestors down to Earth for protection through sacrifices. The Bali Aga leave the bodies of their dead in the jungle to be carried away by the spirits, and they are believed to have possibly eaten parts of their headmen's bodies to absorb magic powers. Family clans are ruled by a council of elders who are also religious priests. The Bali Aga revere the forces of nature and the spirits of their ancestors, with whom they continue to live as a great family of both the living and the dead.

Bali Aga Rites

The Tenganans practice an ancient rite known as mekare kare, the ritual blood sacrifice. This is not as gory as it sounds, but an event where all villagers get involved in an annual ritual combat, using thorny pandan leaves to draw blood.

Each combatant hits his opponent with the aim of drawing blood. The ritual fight will be held every time there is a temple ceremony is Tenganan, which tends to fall in the fifth month of the Balinese calendar.

The fighting and the blood are real, and all participants come well prepared, carrying weapons of a rotan-woven shield and a bundle of thorny pandan leaves, used to scratch the opponent's skin until it bleeds.

Before the fight begins, participants drink rice wine or tuak, fermented local palm, to symbolise brotherhood and sportsmanship. But when the selonding music fills the air, a volley of fierce jeers, insults, cheers and shouts are thrown to instill fear. And the fighting begins.

The fighting is judged by a mediator, most probably a prominent figure of the village, and usually lasts for a fierce 5 to 10 minutes. The first person to draw blood with the thorny weapon is victor, and the person he draws blood from is the vanquished. Both victor and vanquished are broken up by the mediator as soon as blood is drawn.

As the injured are treated with traditional liquid medicines, and all fighters recover their strength, the whole village prepares food and drink for an elaborate feast which must follow the Balinese sacrifice of human blood.

Balinese culture has also got a population control mechanism in their child naming practices, and this is not only confined to the Bali Aga, but encompasses every Balinese. Every first born is named Wayan, second born Made, third Nyoman, and the fourth Ketut. Anymore children will see a repeat of the names following the order. But this practice definitely is a big hint and subtle reminder to stop at a maximum of four!

Balinese Religion

Nearly everything in Bali carries a religious significance from creating stone and wood carvings, cremation ceremonies, trance dances and gamelan music, are intended to please and appease the gods.

As most pleasing and appeasing rituals take place in a temple, temples are, undisputedly, the most important structure in Balinese culture, providing a pleasant resting place for the gods during their stay on the island.

Every house on the island has its own shrine, a resting place for ancestral spirits. Even the paddy fields have a shrine for Dewi Sri, the Rice Goddess. Each village has three temples, the Pura Puseh, dedicated to the villagers' ancestors, the Pura Desa, used for official celebrations, and the Pura Dalem or the temple of death, specially dedicated to the deities of death and of cremation.

Cremation Ceremonies
The Ngaben or Cremation Ceremony is a very important part of Balinese culture. The ceremony is performed to send the dead from death to the next life. When death descends on a Balinese, the village kul kul will sound, hanging in the village temple tower to announce the departure of the deceased.

The body will then be placed at the Bale Delod, and the deceased treated as if sleeping. No tears are shed as the Balinese believe that the deceased will return shortly to be reincarnated into the family.

The Priest will then consult the Dewasa for the day of the ngaben ceremony. On the appointed day, the body of the deceased is placed inside a coffin, which is then placed inside a wadah, or sarcophagus shaped in the form of a buffalo. It is actually a temple structure made of paper and light wood.

The funeral procession then leaves for the cremation site, carrying the wadah. The most important part of the ngaben is the burning of the wadah, with fire taken from a holy source, thus sending the deceased to the afterlife,to prepare for a future reincarnation.

Bali Temples Guide

A guide to the most important temples in Bali
Besakih Temple (Mother Temple)

Over a thousand years old, Besakih Temple is known as the "Mother Temple of Bali" Perched on the slopes of Mount Agung, at a lofty 1,000 meters (3,000 feet) Besakih is the biggest and holiest of all the Balinese temples. Named after the Dragon God believed to inhabit the mountain, it's said to be the only temple where a Hindu of any caste can worship.

Eighteen separate sanctuaries belonging to different regencies and caste groups surround the three main temples dedicated to Shiva, Brahma and Vishnu. To the Balinese, visiting the temple sanctuaries is a special pilgrimage. The mountain top setting gives it an almost mystical quality.

Steps ascend through split gates to the main courtyard where the Trinity shrines, dedicated to Shiva, Brahma, and Vishnu, are wrapped in cloth and decorated with flower offerings. There are are number of temples but many of their inner courtyards are closed to visitors. If travelling on your own, try reach Pura Besakih before 9am, when many tourist buses start to arrive, so that you can take in the lovely temple in the quiet Balinese morning.

Tanah Lot Temple

The royal Taman Ayun temple was built by one of the last priests to come to Bali from Java in the 16th century. The temple stands on top of a huge rock, surrounded by the sea and is one of Bali's most important sea temples. Tanah Lot pays homage to the guardian spirits of the sea.

Ancient rituals pay homage to the guardian spirits of the sea. Poisonous sea snakes found in the caves at the base of the rocky island are believed to be guardians of the temple, standing virgil against evil spirits and intruders.

The best time to see Tanah Lot is in the late afternoon when the temple is in silhouette.


Pura Tirta Empul

Built around a sacred spring, Tampak Siring. An inscription dates the spring all the way back to 926AD; and there are fine carvings and Garudas on the courtyard buildings. The temple and its two bathing spots have been used by the Balinese for over a thousand years for good health and prosperity; as the spring water really does have the power to cure! Regular purification ceremonies also take place here.

Tampak Siring artists produce marvellous bone and ivory carvings. Both sites open daily. By public transport from Ubud, catch a bemo north to Tampaksiring from the junction in Bedulu, which is south-east of Ubud.

A little off the main road in Tampaksiring is Gunung Kawi with its group of large stone memorials cut into cliffs on either side of a picturesque river valley. It is believed to date from 11th century, one is of Bali's most impressive sights.

Ulu Danu

The Bali Culture

Bali is an Indonesian island that is rich in indigenous culture. A lot pf people say that Bali culture is unique and that the people of Bali have always been contented with the “now.” If you ask a Balinese person what heaven is like, the probable answer will be “just like Bali”. This only goes to show that most Balinese people are happy to be where they are and never worry.

One factor that contributes to this laidback lifestyle is the culture of close family ties in Bali. In the Balinese culture, support is always available. Balinese extended families are so tightly knit that all members usually reside in the same complex.

Hinduism is one of the main religions in Bali. The Bali culture is based on a form of this religion, which is called “Hindu Darma”. This religion reached the island during the eleventh century. Most of the family customs and traditions as well as community lifestyles of the Balinese people are influenced by this. The religious influence even expands widely into the arts, which makes Bali distinct from the rest of Indonesia.

In spite of the influx of tourists to the island, Balinese people have managed to preserve their culture. Almost every native of Bali is an artist in some form or another. Parents and villagers have passed on their skills to their children, who all seem to have inclinations either to music, dance, painting, and decor.

Another remarkable mark of the Bali culture is the series of ceremonies and rituals known as the Manusa Yadnya. This marks the different stages of Balinese life. Cremation is very popular on this island – and unlike in the West, death is a joyous and colorful event for the Balinese.

Indeed, Bali has a rich culture, making it distinctive from the rest of the islands in Indonesia

Tuesday, 17 June 2008

Bali Cheap Hotel

In Bali many hotel is not exsvensive
There is some from many hotel addres and cheaper,such us:
Grand Istana Rama (Sup Bathtub) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta, Po Box 3293, Denpasar 80032 - Bali
Kartika Plaza Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Kartika Plaza, P.O.Box 1012 Tuban, South Kuta Beach
Kuta Beach Club Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Singosari No.81, P.O. Box 3226, Kuta 80361
Aneka (Deluxe Junior) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Pantai Kuta,, P.O. Box 2010, Kuta 80361 Bali
Ramayana Resort And Spa Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Bakungsari, Bali-Kuta Beach, Po Box 3334 Denpasar

A-Z of all Hotels in Bali-Kuta Beach
Aneka Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Pantai Kuta, P.O. Box 2010, Kuta 80361 Bali
Aneka (Deluxe Junior) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Pantai Kuta,, P.O. Box 2010, Kuta 80361 Bali
Bali Dynasty Resort Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Kartika P.O Box 2047, Tuban 80361, South Kuta, Bali
Bali Dynasty Resort (Superior Pool View) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Kartika P.O Box 2047, Tuban 80361, South Kuta, Bali
Bali Dynasty(Deluxe) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Kartika P.O Box 2047, Tuban 80361, South Kuta, Bali
Bali Garden Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Dewi Sartika, Tuban Kuta, Bali 80361
Bali Garden(Deluxe) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Dewi Sartika, Tuban Kuta, Bali 80361
Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Kartika Plaza, P.O.Box 1012 Tuban, South Kuta Beach
Febri`S Htl&Spa Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Dewi Sartika, South Kuta Beach, Bali-Indonesia
Febri`S Htl&Spa(Family Deluxe) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Dewi Sartika, South Kuta Beach, Bali-Indonesia
Grand Istana Rama Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta, Po Box 3293, Denpasar 80032 - Bali
Grand Istana Rama (Dlx Cottage) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta, Po Box 3293, Denpasar 80032 - Bali
Grand Istana Rama (Sup Bathtub) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta, Po Box 3293, Denpasar 80032 - Bali
Green Garden Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Kartika Plaza No.9, Tuban, Kuta Beach, Bali
Green Garden Hotel (Family) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Kartika Plaza No.9, Tuban, Kuta Beach, Bali
Hard Rock Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl Pantai, Banjar Pande Mas,, Kuta,, Bali
Harris Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta, Po Box 2073, Kuta Bali 80361
Harris (Harris Room) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta, Po Box 2073, Kuta Bali 80361
Ida Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Kahyangan Suci, Off Jl. Tegal Wangi, Bali-Kuta Beach 80361
Inna Kuta Beach Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta 1, Kuta,, Po Box 3393 - Denpasar 80361, Bali
Inna Kuta Beach - Bungalow Standard Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta 1 Kuta, Denpasar 80361, Bali
Inna Kuta Beach - Superior Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jalan Pantai Kuta 1 Kuta, Denpasar 80361, Bali
Kartika Plaza Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Kartika Plaza, P.O.Box 1012 Tuban, South Kuta Beach
Kuta Beach Club Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Singosari No.81, P.O. Box 3226, Kuta 80361
Kuta Beach Club(Deluxe) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Singosari No.81, P.O. Box 3226, Kuta 80361
Kuta Seaview Cottage Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Pantai Kuta, Po.Box.3036 Denpasar - Bali, Bali-Kuta Beach
Kuta Seaview Cottage(Deluxe) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Pantai Kuta, Po.Box.3036 Denpasar - Bali, Bali-Kuta Beach
Paradiso Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Kartika Plaza, Tuban, Bali-Kuta Beach
Ramada Bintang Bali Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl Kartika Plaza, Kuta, Bali Island
Ramayana Resort And Spa Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Bakungsari, Bali-Kuta Beach, Po Box 3334 Denpasar
Ramayana Resort And Spa Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Bakungsari, Bali-Kuta Beach, Po Box 3334 Denpasar
Samsara Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Legian No.190 Kuta Bali, P.O Box 1101, Tuban Kuta Bali 80361
Santika Beach Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Kartika Plaza, Po.Box 1008, Tuban, Kuta, Bali.
Santika Beach (Deluxe) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Kartika Plaza, Po.Box 1008, Tuban, Kuta, Bali.
Santika Beach (Grdn Bungalow) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Kartika Plaza, Po.Box 1008, Tuban, Kuta, Bali.
Wina Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Pantai Kuta, Kuta 80361, Bali - Indonesia
Wina Holiday Villa-Deluxe Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl.Pantai Kuta, Bali 80361, Indonesia
Yulia Beach Inn Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Pantai Kuta 43, 80361 Bali, Bali-Kuta Beach
Yulia Beach Inn(Deluxe) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Pantai Kuta 43, 80361 Bali, Bali-Kuta Beach
Yulia Beach Inn(Super Deluxe) Hotel Bali-Kuta Beach
Jl. Pantai Kuta 43, 80361 Bali, Bali-Kuta Beach

Monday, 16 June 2008

Ubud Writers And Readers Festival

Sekala-Niskala | The Seen and The Unseen


The fourth international Ubud Writers & Readers Festival promises to charm you once again, with four days of inspiring discussions, performances, literary lunches and readings in one of the world’s most beautiful settings.

Discussions on world religions, mysticism and the power of the paranormal will grace the stage alongside other global issues as we explore our 2007 theme, Sekala-Niskala | The Seen or Unseen. Sekala-Niskala is a Balinese principal that holds that we all live equally in two worlds; the seen or conscious world Sekala and the unseen or psychic world Niskala.

Join us for four days and nights of intimate interviews with authors from all corners of the globe, as the unseen becomes the seen and more. Enter Egypt with writers from one of the world’s most ancient lands, as we hear their tales of life from the home of the Arabian Nights with Somaya Ramadan and Iman Mersal.UK writer, Patrick Gale, author of Notes from an Exhibition will lead you into the realms of troubled families and distorted relationships.

Our Indian neighbours will take us on a captivating journey through one of the most mystical countries on earth. 2006 Booker prize-winning author, Kiran Desai will share her inspiration for her award-winning novel, ‘The Loss of Inheritance’ while acclaimed author, journalist and former UN diplomat, Shashi Tharoor, will challenge us with his thoughts on literature, leaders and world peace. Richard Flanagan, one of the most exciting voices in contemporary Australian literature will discuss his best-selling novel “The Unknown Terrorist.”

Indonesian poets and writers will charm you in two languages, alongside Asian voices from Singapore and the Phillipines. Malaysian author, Tan Twan Eng, long-listed for the 2007 Booker-prize, will discuss Penang in the 30’s and compare notes with Canadian award-winning writer, Madeleine Thien with her novel Uncertainty.

From across the seas, Hagar Peteers from the Netherlands is guaranteed to whirr you with her words and on the home front, the enigmatic Cok Sawitri will leave you breathless with her haunting performance poetry.Join sessions and workshops on the craft of writing for passionate readers and writers. Celebrate the written word at the free nighttime events and enjoy literary shenanigans into the early hours of the morning at the Casa Luna Festival club.

The 2007 Festival explores new frontiers with writers from the South Korea, East Timor and Sweden. They will join award-winning writers, poets, playwrights, filmmakers and performers from Indonesia, Asia, Australia, England, Canada, France, United States, Sri Lanka, New Zealand and beyond in an unforgettable exchange of culture and ideas.

It all adds up to a tropical heat wave of inspiration and excitement!

History of Bali


The arrival of the Hindu people from India marked the end of prehistorical period in Indonesia. The first centuries AD until the year of 1500, ie with the fall of Majapahit kingdom, constituted the Hindu influence period. Based on the information found on an 8th century AD inscription, it could be said that the ancient Balinese historical period covered the time between the 8th and the 14th century AD when the Majapahit's Gajah Mada expedition invaded and defeated Bali.

The term Balidwipa (meaning Bali island) has existed since time immemorial. This has been discovered from various inscriptions. Among these inscriptions were Blanjong charter which was issued by Sri Kesari Warmadewa in 913 AD mentioned the word Walidwipa. Similar evidence was from King Jayapangus' charters: Buwahan D and Cempaga A inscriptions dated 1181 AD.

Introduction to Bali

Bali, a province of Indonesia, is comprised of several islands: Bali, Penida, Ceningan, Lembongan, and Menjangan. Bali covers an area of 5,632.86 square kilometres with a population of 3,021,247. These averages out to 517 inhabitants per km2.

The Bali strait separated Bali from East Java on the western side. Meanwhile, the Lombok strait on the eastern side separated Bali and Lombok. Administratively, the Province of Bali is divided into 9 districts (8 regencies and 1 municipality), 51 sub districts, 565 villages, and 79 local political districts.

Geographically, Bali is located at 80-30’-40" to 80-50’-48" south of the equator and 1140-25’-53" to 1150-42’-40" east longitude.

Bali's relief and topography have their main features of a mountain range that transverse the island from west to east. Among those mountains are two of significant sizes: Agung ( 3,140 m ) and Batur (1,717 m).

Bali also has four lakes: Beratan (375.6 Ha), Buyan (336 Ha), Tamblingan (11 Ha), and Batur (1,607.5). Rivers, which have their sources on these lakes as well as forests, flow to the southern side of the island. Among these rivers are: Ayung, Ho, Loloan, Pakerisan, Petanu, Pulukan, and Unda.

Bali has a tropical climate, which is influenced by seasonal wind pattern and alternate every six months. There are two seasons: the dry season (April - October) and the wet season (October - April). Temperatures vary from 24 °C to 30.8 °C. Rainfall during the last five years ranged between 893.4 mm and 2,702.6 mm.

Humidity averages are 90 %, during the wet season as high as 100 % and in the dry season around 60 %.

Friday, 13 June 2008

Map of Bali Bali Island


MALAY Archipelago lies directly on the volcanic belt of the world. Like the backbone of some restless, formidable antediluvian monster, more than three hundred volcanoes rise from The sea in a great chain of islands - perhaps all that remains of A continent broken up in prehistoric cataclysms - forming a continuous land bridge that links Asia with Australia. Because of its peculiar and fantastic nature, its complex variety of peoples, and its fabulous richness, the archipelago is one of the most fascinating regions of the earth. It includes famous islands like Java, Borneo, Sumatra, New Guinea, the Philippines, and the hysterical. Island-volcano of Krakatao. Such freaks of nature as the giant " dragon " lizards of Komodo, the coloured lakes of Flores, the orangutans, the rafflesia (a flower over three feet in diameter), and the birds of paradise, are to be found nowhere else, The population of the islands ranges from such forms of primitive humanity as the Negritos, the Papuans, the Kubus, who seem only a few steps away in the evolutionary scale from the orangutan, to the super civilized Hindu-Javanese, who over six hundred years ago built monuments like Borobudur and Prambanan, jewels of Eastern art.

Through the centuries, civilization upon civilization from all directions has settled on the islands over the ancient megalithic cultures of the aborigines, until each island has developed an individual character, with a colorful culture, according to whether Chinese, Hindu, Malay, Polynesian, Mohammedan, or European influence has prevailed. Despite the mental isolation these differences have created, even the natives believe that the islands once formed a unified land. Raffles, in his History of lava, mentions a Javanese legend that says, " the continent was split into nine parts, but when three thousand rainy seasons will have elapsed, the Eastern Islands shall again be reunited and the power of the white man shall end."

One of the smallest, but perhaps the most extraordinary, of the islands, is the recently famous Bali - a cluster of high volcanoes, their craters studded with serene lakes set in dark forests filled with screaming monkeys. The long green slopes of the volcanoes, deeply furrowed by ravines washed out by rushing rivers full of rapids and waterfalls, drop steadily to the sea without forming lowlands. just eight degrees south of the Equator, Bali has over two thousand square miles of extravagantly fertile lands, most of which are beautifully cultivated. Only a narrow strait, hardly two miles across, separates Bali from Java; here again the idea that the two islands were once joined and then separated is sustained by the legend of the great Javanese king who was obliged to banish his good-for-nothing son to Bali, then united to Java by a very narrow isthmus. The king accompanied his son to the narrowest point of the tongue of land; when the young prince had disappeared from sight, to further emphasize the separation, he drew a line with his finger across the sands. The waters met and Bali became an island.

The dangers lurking in the waters around the island suggest a possible reason why Bali remained obscure and unconquered until 1908. Besides the strong tidal currents and the great depths of the straits, the coasts are little indented and are constantly exposed to the full force of the monsoons; where they are not bordered by dangerous coral banks, they rise from the sea in steep cliffs. Anchorage is thus out of the question except far out to sea, and the Dutch have bad to build an artificial port in Benoa to afford a berth for small vessels.

The beginning there was nothing, all was emptiness; there was only space. Before there were the heavens, there was no earth, and when there was no earth, there was no sky. Through meditation, the world serpent Antaboga created the turtle Bedawang, on whom lie coiled two snakes as the foundation of the World. On the world turtle rests a lid, the Black Stone. There is no sun, there is no moon, there is no night in the cave below (the underside of the stone); this is the underworld, whose gods are the male Batara Kala and the female Setesuyara. There lives also the great serpent Basuki."

Kala created the light and Mother Earth, over which extends a layer of water. Over this again are consecutive domes or skies, high and low; one of mud (which dried to become the earth and the mountains); then the 'empty' middle sky (the atmosphere), where Iswara dwells; above this is the floating sky, the clouds, where Semara sits, the god of love. Beyond that follows the 'dark' (blue) sky with the sun and the moon, the home of Surya; this is why they are above the clouds. Next is the Perfumed Sky beautiful and full of rare flowers where live the bird Tiak, whose face is like a human face, the serpent Taksaka, who has legs and wings, and the awan snakes, the falling stars. Still higher in the sky gringsing wayang, the' flaming heaven of the ancestors! And over all the skies live the great gods who keep watch over the heavenly nymphs." Thus we have it that the island rests on the turtle, which floats on the ocean.

As the last Asiatic outpost to the east, Bali is interesting to the naturalist as an illustration of the theory of evolution. In 1869 Alfred Russell Wallace discovered that the fauna and flora typical of Asia end in Bali, while the earlier, more primitive biologi. cal forms found in Australia begin to appear in the neighboring island of Lombok, just east of Bali.

This is from the Catur Yoga, a popular manuscript which translated for the sake of practice on the language. It consists of ideas on cosmogony, mythology, legends of the creation of man, etc., ending in a confused set of rules for crema tion and Balinese genealogies.

(Banteng), Monkeys, woodpeckers, pythons, etc., of Asia are not to be found farther east, and the cockatoos, parrots, and giant lizards predominate. Bali has the luxuriant vegetation of tropical Asia, while Lombok is and and thorny, like Australia. Wallace drew a line across the narrow straits between Bali and Lombok, the deepest waters in the archipelago, to divide Asia from Oceania.' Today, however, scientists are more inclined to regard the islands as a transitional region.

As in all countries near the Equator, Bali has an eternal summer with even, warm weather, high humidity, and a regular variation of winds, but the unbearable heat of lands similarly situated is greatly relieved by sea breezes that blow constantly over the descending slopes of the four volcanoes that form the island. The seasons are not distinguished as hot and cold, but as wet and dry. It is pleasantly cool and dry during our summer months, when the southeasterly winds blow, but in November the north-west monsoon ushers in six months of a rainy season so violent that it makes everything rot away, growing green whiskers of mould on shoes that are not shined every day. Then the atmosphere becomes hot and sticky and the torrential rains that lash the island cause landslides that often carry enormous trees into the deep ravines cut into the soft volcanic ash by the rivers, themselves red with earth washed from the mountain. Brooks and rivers swell into huge torrents (banjir) that rise unexpectedly with a deafening roar, in front of one's eyes, carrying away earth, plants, and occasional drowned pigs, destroying bridges and irrigation works. It is not unusual for a careless bather to be surprised by a sudden banjir and to be carried away in the muddy stream.

It is only natural that in a land of steep mountains, with such abundant rains, crossed in all directions by streams and great rivers, on a soil impregnated with volcanic ash, the earth should attain great richness and fertility. The burning tropical sun shining on the saturated earth produces a steaming, electric, hot. house atmosphere that gives birth to the dripping jungles that cover the slopes of the. Volcanoes with prehistoric tree-ferns, pandanus, and palms, strangled in a mesh of creepers of all sorts, their trunks smothered with orchids and alive with leeches, fantastic butterflies, birds, and screeching wild monkeys. This exuberance extends to the cultivated parts of the island, where-the rice fields that cover this over-populated land produce every year, and without great effort, two crops of the finest rice in the Indies.

Despite the enormous population, the lack of running water has kept the western part of the island uninhabited and wild. The few remaining tigers, and the deer, wild bog, crocodiles, great lizards, jungle cocks, etc., are the sole dwellers in this and hilly country covered with a dusty, low brush. Curiously enough, the Balinese regard this deserted land (Pulaki) as their place of origin. They explain in an old legend that a great city, which still exists, once flourished there, but has been made invisible to human eyes by Wahu Rahu, the greatest Brahmana from Java, who was forced to flee from the capital, Gelgel, to save his beautiful daughter from the king (by caste his inferior) and who found refuge in Pulaki by making the city invisible to the wicked king and his followers.

Another and region in contrast with the extravagant fertility of the island is the peninsula of limestone called Tafelhoek (Bukit to the Balinese) which rises to a height of 700 feet above the sea. This curious tableland, which shows every indication of having once been at the bottom of the ocean, is joined to the mainland by 2 low, narrow isthmus, but its sides rise almost vertically from the sea, and on the extremity of a long narrow rock, with a straight drop Of 250 feet, is the fantastically situated temple of Uluwatu, one of the holiest in Bali. This projecting rock is believed to be the ship, turned to stone, of Dewi Danu, the goddess of waters.

The mountains with their likes and rivers are the home of the gods and the sources of the land's fertility, and they stand for everything that is holy and healthy. To the Balinese everything that is high is good and powerful, so it is natural that the sea, lower than the lowest point of land, with the sharks and barracuda that infest the waters, and the deadly sea-snakes and poisonous fish that live among the treacherous coral reefs, should be considered as tenget, magically dangerous, the home of the evil spirits. Few Balinese know how to Swim and they rarely venture into the sea except to bathe near the shallow beaches, and then they go only a few feet from the shore. There are small settlements of fishermen who brave the malarial coasts of Kuta, Sanur, Benua, and Ketewel, but in general fishing is done on a small scale, either with casting-nets, or in beautiful prows shaped like fantastic.

Elephant-fish " (gajah-mina) with elegant stylized trunks, and eyes to see at night. With their triangular sails apex downward, they go far out to sea at sunset to procure the giant sea-turtles required at the frequent banquets of this feast-loving people. Most Balinese seldom eat fish and remain essentially a rice-eating race. Their repugnance for the sea may be due to the same religious fear of the supernatural that prevents them from climbing to the summit of the great mountains. The Balinese feel that the heights are for the gods, the middle world for humans, and the depths and low points for the spirits of the underworld. They dread the unholy loneliness of the beaches haunted by demons and they believe that the coastline is under the influence of Jero Gede Mecaling, the Fanged Giant, who lives on the barren island of Nusa Penida. They are one of the rare island peoples in the world who turn their eyes not outward to the waters, but upward to the mountain tops.

Tumpek Landep: Revitalising The Tools

This Saturday, June 14, 2008, is a special day to honour all types of tools or machinery called Tumpek Landep. When you go out to the street you will see gegantungan (an offering made of coconut leaves and flowers) hanging on the cars or motorcycles. At a Balinese home, the family conduct a prayer in their family temple and also put offerings in the tools like knives, sickles, daggers and spades.

Tumpek Landep is another pawukon-based ceremony that takes place every 6 months (210 days). The word landep means "sharp" as in knife or machete. In the old days, the offerings were devoted to honour sharp sacred weapon, such as kris (traditional wavy double-bladed dagger) and tombak (spear). The people believed that those weapons had pasupati (a spiritual power that protects the sacred weapon) and they especially honour the Hyang Pasupati, a manifestation of God, which symbolises sharpness. They hoped that Hyang Pasupati blessed them with sharpness in mind and heart.

The Tumpek Landep concept has somehow extended to more modern day tools. Their offerings are not limited to kris and tombak but any other iron-based inanimate objects such as cars, buses, rifles, television, computer, and digital camera. The messages, however, are still the same that is to maintain the pasupati power, so these tools can continue help people to work in their daily life.

Wednesday, 11 June 2008

The Saraswati Day At Balinese

This Saturday (june 2008) is an important moment in appreciation of knowledge in Bali. You can witness a religious ceremony called "Piodalan Saraswati" or the Saraswati Day, the day to worship God in His manifestation as the master of all knowledge. Every six months according to the Balinese calendar called pawukon (from Balinese word "wuku" which means week) on Saniscara Umanis Watugunung, Balinese Hindus give their greatest honour to the knowledge.

Most of the students in Bali will be busy performing the ceremony at schools, colleges and their houses. At home, they arrange books, magazines, dictionaries and everything related to the physical representation of knowledge, put them on the altar-like table. Special offerings called canang Saraswati and some other offerings are presented. They would not touch and read their books from morning until evening. Any activities that harm, burn and scratch books are considered as a betrayal of knowledge.

There are two important days that considered as the preparation day, called Petegtegan and Pangredanan, which fall on Wednesday (October, 30) and Friday (October, 31). Both Petegtegan and Pangredanan remind us to be aware constantly, to do self-introspection, to face all the worldly temptation by holding the purity of knowledge.

"Saraswati", the goddess of knowledge, by Ginarsa.
Goddes Saraswati, an icon of knowledge

In every ceremony, Balinese Hindus always come up with their imaginary symbols. They symbolise Saraswati or Ida Sang Hyang Aji Saraswati, the goddes of knowledge as a beautiful woman with some attributes. She has four hands, riding on a white swan among water lilies to tell humanity that knowledge is like a beautiful woman, very enchanting. Her hands hold a palm leaf; a lontar (a traditional book that usually written in Balinese letters); a genitri (a chain with 108 pieces of small ball) symbolises that knowledge is never ending and has an everlasting life cycle; and a guitar or wina (musical instrument) symbolises that science develops through the growth of culture. The swans symbolise prudence, so that one's knowledge may distinguish between good and evil. The water lilies or lotuses are the symbols for holiness.

Some people prefer not to sleep all night, they perform some activities that have relationship with Saraswati day, like mekidung or mekekawin (singing a holy song) and meditation.

Banyu Pinaruh
On Banyu Pinaruh, which falls on Sunday(November, 2), is a moment to reinvent yourself. People go to beach, lake or river and have a swim or wash to purify their mind, body and soul.


Some people take a bath with toya kumkuman (water mixed with flowers) and they will drink loloh (traditional medicine made from various leaves which is very good for our health) then pray together with their family begging for pure knowledge and wisdom.

The series of ceremonies to celebrate Saraswati Day indicate the importance of knowledge has to human life. The more knowledge people have, the wiser they should be in speech, thought and deed.

The Grandeur Of Bali



Welcome to Inna Grand Bali Beach, the island of Bali's original - and now newest - resort destination. The Grand Bali Beach located on the site of Bali's first five-star hotel - the Hotel Bali Beach founded in 1966 - is the most complete resort complex in Bali, featuring state-of-the-art visitor facilities, but
also numerous artistic amenities that bring to life the cultural excellence of the Balinese people and their many talented neighbors.


Opened: Original on 1 November 1996. Relaunched, after major upgrading, on 4 October 1993.
Location: On the long, white sandy beach of Sanur from the luxurious ten-storey central tower building, the highest in Bali, landscaped tropical gardens spread out over 45 hectares, with a wide range of recreational facilities & the modern SPA.


RESTAURANT AND BARS
Candi Oriental Restaurant
Baris Karaoke Bar
Rajapala Lobby Lounge
Warung Beringin Indonesian Restaurant
Bali Hai Rooftop Restaurant & Bar
Bali Kopi Shop, 24 hours coffee shop
Golf Restaurant and Bar
Bowling Bar
Baruna Poolside Snack Bar
Room Service 24 hours
Shinta Snack Bar
Tirta Bar and Pizzeria

Tuesday, 10 June 2008

Bali Sea Walk

This may be a little bit late to expose, but who know some of you still doesn’t have any idea what’s this.

Seawalker is a new underwater activities in Bali, with the equipment specially design to walk underwater without letting your hair get wet, you can watch and feed the fish around and the opportunity to observe underwater world to a depth of 15 feet.

A large transparent helmet will let you watch the amazing underwater life. Each of the helmet is connected with a pipe that feed you with oxygen.

Monday, 9 June 2008

Pagerwesi Day

Pagerwesi is a Wich one ceremony from balinese
Pagerwesi Day: The Day to Honour the main Guru

Pagerwesi Day, which falls on Wednesday (November, 5), is the third most celebrated holidays in Bali after Galungan and Nyepi Day. Balinese Hindus celebrate Pagerwesi every six months (210 days) according to the pawukon calendar systems. Pagerwesi derived from words "pager (fence)" and "wesi (iron)", simply "iron fence", is a day to strengthen one's fortification against evil.

Pagerwesi is dedicated to honour Siva, the God manifestation as Hyang Pramesi Guru (the main Guru), and has a very close relationship with Saraswati day. It falls three days after Saraswati day, and there's continuity meaning between them. In Pagerwesi people honour the main Guru (God or Siva) that transferred knowledge during Saraswati day. It also means that the knowledge must be protected from bad influences and misuse.

If we are looking back to the roots of Hinduism in Bali, which was originated from India, there is a similar ceremony called Guru Puja or Guru Purnima. The Indians, however, celebrate it in a very different way and day. They celebrate Guru Puja on Purnama Kasa or the first new moon every year. Pagerwesi reminds human to be wise and more aware to the function and power of knowledge.

Bali Park

Bali has several place for wild animals, the Bali Bird Park, Bali Reptile Park, and Bali Elephant Park, all in central of Bali, Ubud in Gianyar Regency. Now there will be another series of Taman Safari, I hope this will be the biggest and complete one. Bali Safari Park.
Bali Safari Park or Bali Taman Safari is about to open in Gianyar Regency, an hour drive from Kuta. Still not sure when will be the opening day, the management of the park still gathering a broad selection of wild animals to fill the park. The park already have reindeers, camels and wild pig.

Soon, there will be big animals including elephants, reptiles, and animals from around the world. This safari park is open by the same company who own the biggest park in Indonesia. The Taman Safari Park in Bogor (Java).

For information call (0361) 950 000

Sunday, 8 June 2008

Bali Good Hotel

Bali Hotels

Wotif.com has great rates on Bali accommodation to allow you to enjoy all the island has to offer: From friendly people, to the vibrant and colourful culture; from lively nightspots, to deserted beaches; from volcanoes, to temples; from rice fields, to rainforests. Bali is an island just off the Indonesian coast near East Java, with a population of 3 million people. While staying in one of our Bali hotels, soak in local culture with a visit to one of the island's 20,000 temples and palaces, or attend a festival or traditional dance performance.

Stay in our Kuta hotels or Legian Beach accommodation to experience Bali's most popular resort areas. Both areas boast beautiful beaches and a happening nightlife and offer a variety of water sports including surfing, windsurfing, sailing, scuba diving and white water rafting.

While staying in our Bali accommodation explore the island's many volcanoes, of which Gunung Agung is the tallest at 3142m. Mountains, and particularly volcanoes, are considered sacred by the locals and Gunung Agung is believed to be the centre of universe. Our Ubud accommodation is a great base to explore Mt Batur, a volcano which contains a large lake and the surrounding area which is famous for its vibrant art and crafts culture where the locals specialise in painting and wood carving.

Soak in local culture, while staying in one of our Denpasar hotels, by visiting the Bali Museum, built by the Dutch government in 1932, which boasts an excellent collection of Balinese art and a variety of items including Neolithic stone implements, Metal Age sarcophagi, and Buddhist and Hindu bronzes carvings and ceremonial masks. Also Taman Wedhi Budaya, the Bali Arts Center in Denpasar, is worth a visit as it boasts an excellent collection of modern Balinese painting and wood carving and large dance arena where traditional dances and recitations of classical literature are performed.

Tuesday, 3 June 2008

BALI ISLAND OF GODS AND DEMONS







Both magical and mythical, this land of volcanic lakes, spectacular rice terraces, stunning tropical beaches, ancient temples and palaces is and exotic melting pot of cultures and peoples. Renowned of its unsurpassed architecture, traditional theatre, dance and elaborate religious festivals, the colorful Balinese culture is a dynamic force that is constantly synthesizing the old and the new, the traditional and the innovative.

LOCATION
Bali is one of more than 18 thousands island in Indonesia. It is located between the two islands Java & Nusa Tenggara, between 8 03 40 8 degree South latitude and 114 25 & 115 42 40 degree East longitude.
Bali has 5.632,86 square kilometers of land. The total population is approximately 3.2 million people.
Standard time zone is UTC/GMT + 8 hours.



REGENCIES
As a part of 30 provinces in the Republic of Indonesia, Bali is divided into 8 regencies ( Badung, Gianyar , Tabanan , Bangli , Karangasem , Jembrana , Buleleng and Klungkung, 1 municipal city (Denpasar), 51 districts and 666 administrative villages.
Denpasar is the capital city of Bali province.

Mount Agung is used as orientation and considered North (Kaja) while the sea is considered South (Kelod). This is the reason why "south" in Buleleng is the opposite of "south" in Badung. In Hindu perspective, north direction (mount) is a holy place while on the southern part is the insulted place.

In the division of area, it is analogized the anatomy of the body: head, body and legs as utama (main), madya (medium) and nista (insult). Therefore, the holy place is located in north edge, in the middle as a place of residence and in the south as place of cemetery. Even, for sleeping, head is faced to north or east and legs are directed to south or west.

THE PEOPLE
The Balinese are one of the 250 ethnic groups in the Indonesian archipelago. Most of them (95%) are Hindus, a religion which came from India, passing through Sumatera and Java. After the fall of Majapahit empire all the Hindu aristocrats and the common people fled to Bali, bringing along their religion, traditions, literature and arts. Other religions like Christianity or Moslem, Buddhism are also in Bali. But all live in peace, there is no conflict of religion or conflict of ethnics. The population of Bali are three million people. Most of them live in the southern part of the island. Here the tourist resorts are located such as Sanur, Kuta and Nusa Dua. The Balinese people are very creative. They have created and are still creating various kinds of artistic creativities such as wood carving (statues), paintings, gold and silver smith, handicrafts, dances and religious offerings. Nearly everyday there are religious ceremonies in the temples spread all over the island. There are the so called "Bali Aga"; people, the original Balinese communities in several places like in Tenganan or Trunyan. It is worthwhile to visit them there.

CLIMATE
Bali has tropical climate all year with two different seasons namely dry season from April to October and wet season from November to March. The average temperature hovers around 30 degrees Celsius year-round. The average yearly rainfall between 893,4 mm till 2702,6 mm with average humidity is 79%.
Bali Weather

POPULATION
Bali has 5.632,86 square kilometers of land.
The total population is approximately 3.021.247 people.

IMMIGRATION & CUSTOMS
Immigration Offices:
Jl. D. I. Panjaitan, Niti Mandala, Complex Renon - Denpasar
Phone : (62 361) 238 168
Ngurah Rai Airport Complex, Tuban, Kuta
Phone : (62 361) 751 038
Customs regulations allow, per adult, a maximum of one litter of alcoholic beverages, 200 cigarettes, 50 cigars or 100 gram of tobacco and a reasonable amount of perfume. Photographic, video and filming equipments, radio, typewriter and car are admitted as they are recorded in you passport on entry and taken out on departure. Narcotics, arms and ammunition TV, sets and Chinese medicines are items that strictly prohibited while fresh fruit, plant and animals must be passed by the Quarantine Office.

BANK & MONEY EXCHANGE
Most foreign currencies are easily changed at banks, hotels or money changers. Banking hours are from 8.00am to 14.00 noon Mondays to Fridays, and from 8.00am to 11.00am on Saturdays. Bank in Hotels usually stay open longer hours while Money Changers are generally open till evening. ATM is available in many places, provides VISA, MASTER, ALTO and more.

MEDICAL SERVICES & HOSPITAL
Hospitals and Health Centers staffed by well trained doctors and medical-assistants are available in major tourist resort and the Provincial Capital. Public Health Centre is also available at every Sub district unit.

Sanglah Hospital
Jl. Diponegoro, Denpasar
Ph. (62 361) 227 911
SOS
Jl. Bypass Ngurah Rai 505x, Kuta
Ph. (62 361) 710 505
Bali Medical Center
Jl. Bypass Ngurah Rai 100x, Kuta
Ph. (62 361) 761 263



CONTACT NUMBERS
Police : 110
Ambulance : 118
Fire Department : 113
SAR : 115/151/111

TELECOMMUNICATION SERVICES
Bali is linked via satellite to all major countries in the world and to make an International call can be made from any private house, business center, hotel telephone, or "Wartel" (Telecommunication Counter). Internet is also can be reached at many "Warnet" (Internet Counter). For local and international phone and fax service look out for a sign like this: Int'l Direct Dialing 001 or 008 + country code + area code + local telephone number. Int'l Direct Inquiries : 102, 101
Local Inquiries : 147
Operator Assisted : 110/104